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What’s the Difference Between a Certified Athletic Trainer and a personal trainer?

Let’s Discuss Certified Athletic Trainers vs Personal Trainers

“Oh, I bet you’re in great shape!” “I need you to help me lose weight.” “Can you make me a workout plan?” Every Athletic Trainer has heard these statements and similar ones after first introducing themselves and their occupation. So, what is the difference between a Certified Athletic Trainer and a personal trainer? The terms are very similar, so it makes sense that people would be easily confused. Typically, my response is something like “Actually, you know those people that run out on the football field when someone gets hurts – that’s what I do.” It’s much easier to give an example than to try and explain everything that an AT is capable of because there’s so much!

An Athletic Trainer, as defined by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, is a highly qualified, multi-skilled health care professional who collaborates with physicians to provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions. In order to call yourself an AT you must graduate from an accredited master’s program, pass a board exam and in 49 states you are also required to be licensed in order to practice. AT’s must always have their CPR, First Aid and basic life support certification up to date and complete continuing education hours every year. All this to say that Athletic Trainers can do anything from perform chest compressions on a heart attack patient to taking a professional football player through an entire ACL rehabilitation process. In the past they were associated mainly with college and professional athletics, but these days they are employed by clinics, hospitals, performing arts companies, police and fire departments and even health departments in commercial settings.

A personal trainer is someone who works one-on-one with a client to implement a fitness regimen. They have an understanding of human anatomy and physiology and are great motivators. Personal trainers inspire their clients to reach for their goals and hold them accountable for their diet and routines outside of the gym. Personal trainers must pass an exam in order to practice and are obtain a certification. The top 5 certifications are from the American Council on Exercise, the National Academy of Sports Medicine, the American College of Sports Medicine, the International Sports Sciences Association and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Many of these courses require pre-requisite classes and a CPR and First Aid certification before even beginning them. Personal trainers are also required to complete continuing education hours.

Ultimately the best way to stay healthy and fit is to work with both types of professionals. One will make sure you are exercising properly and safely and the other can address any soreness or injuries you may incur while getting into shape.

Gate River Run Training Series at Sports Recovery Annex

Sports Recovery Annex’s Dedicated Gate River Run Training Series

Now is the time to start training for one of Jacksonville’s biggest races of the year! It’s the perfect way to kick-start those running goals for 2019.

The Gate River Run, formerly known as the Jacksonville River Run, is an annual 15-kilometer road running event in Jacksonville, Fla. It was voted as one of the top US road races for the last 20 years by Runner’s World magazine.

As one of the top recovery facilities in Florida, Sports Recovery Annex is providing a select group of competitors access to top doctors and decorated marathoners for a 9-week series on how to train for the Gate River Run. The series will consist of five lectures, four recovery runs and recovery in between! If completing one of the most popular races in the country is one of your 2019 goals, come join us for this 9-week series!

What do the lectures cover?

Lecture 1: How to Train for the Gate River Run with Elite Runner and Coach Julie Stackhouse

Lecture 1 will be led by certified running coach and owner of Stackhouse Fitness, Julie Stackhouse. A Brooks sponsored athlete and avid runner herself, Julie Stackhouse will go over effective training techniques for the Gate River Run. These techniques will teach you the best way to pace yourself and keep yourself from burning out during the race.

Lecture 2: How to Pick Correct Running Shoes and Other Equipment with Chris McCaffrey

Chris McCaffrey is store manager of 1st Place Sports Running and running coach for PRS. Ever wonder what the best shoe for running is? Can insoles help you achieve your next personal record? We will dive into footwear and how it can enhance your running.

Lecture 3: How to Prevent Injuries During Your Training with Dr. Kaitlyn Iselborn

Our resident physical therapist, Dr. Kaitlyn Iselborn, will be focusing on injury prevention as you increase your mileage and speed. Dr. Iselborn’s love for the sport runs deep, having been a collegiate runner for Florida State University. During this lecture she will be going over some important steps you should take to help care for your body during training. She will explain how to both prevent and treat any injury or ailment that may arise.

Lecture 4: How to Properly Fuel Your Body for Training with Whitney Hochstetler

Whitney Hochstetler is a registered dietitian that specializes in sports nutrition. She works with athletes of all ages to help them fuel for their specific sport and goals. During her class she will be going over good fuel sources for your training runs and before race day. She will provide examples of bars and chews to help you power through all those miles.

Lecture 5: How to Mentally Prepare for the Gate River Run with Joan Thurston

Joan Thurston is a licensed mental health counselor. She provides counseling to student athletes at the high school and college level who are dealing with issues of performance, stress, anxiety, academic pressures, time management, injury and other concerns that affect athletes’ performance and well-being. She will discuss how to have a positive mental state throughout your training and on race day.

This 9-week training series is perfect for runners of all ages and paces. Whether you have run the Gate River Run before or it’s your first time, this 9-week series is perfect for you. Included with your registration is access to our certified athletic trainers, attendance to all lectures, participation in all recovery runs and recovery during your training and after the Gate!

Please give us a call at (904)402-4399 to register. The registration fee of $50 will go directly towards benefiting Marathon High!

Active Recovery for Runners: An oxymoron or something more?

active recovery

 

Believe it or not, research shows that active recovery is the best way to keep your maintain your fitness on days off.  Active recovery, or cross training, is taking a break from your normal training regimen by doing another activity.  For instance, a football player may swim laps on his off day.  Working out instead of remaining completely sedentary has been shown to aid in recovery by increasing blood flow to damaged tissues and reducing the amount of atrophy that occurs to muscles even 24 hours post workout.

 

If you are training 5-6 days per week consider incorporating one of these workouts into your schedule.

 

1. Riding a Bike

Biking is a great way to actively recover without exhausting your body.  There’s less impact on your joints when biking as compared to running and depending upon the terrain you can increase the difficulty of the exercise.   If biking isn’t necessarily an activity you enjoy invite some friends to ride with you on a Saturday morning and make it a social event.  The miles will fly by and you’ll hardly notice the time.

 

active recovery

2. Running on the AlterG

The AlterG is a state of the art treadmill that uses NASA technology to decrease your body weight up to 20%.  For active recovery purposes, it’s best to set your body weight percentage at 85-90%.  Even this small decrease in weight relieves pressure on your ankles, knees, and hips while still allowing your body to go through the normal running motion.  Running on the AlterG even once a week can increase your speed and add to your mileage.

Schedule your Alter-G session, here: BOOK YOUR SESSION 

3. Swimming

People tend to disregard swimming even though it’s fantastic whole body cardio exercise because it involves a little more preparation.   However, throwing a swimsuit and towel into your gym bag pales in comparison to the benefits of a 30-minute swim.  Swimming laps at an even pace adds to your oxygen capacity and is a resistance exercise for your upper body, which may get neglected during training.

 

So whether you’re training for your first 5k or your 20th marathon, remember to stay active on those off days!

 

Marathon Recovery

Recovery

You train for months leading up to a marathon. You learn as much as you can to help ensure you will cross the finish line. But what should you do after the marathon or a long training run to help achieve a healthy recovery?

Food and beverages

  • As soon as you feel like you can drink something, drink water. This should be done immediately after your run. As soon as you can, progress to a sports drink, fruit juice, soda or any other source of simple sugar-type carbohydrate beverage. Skim or 1 percent chocolate milk is also a good recovery beverage because it has sugar and protein.
  • Begin eating when you feel like you can handle it. Typically, this will be between 5 to 10 minutes after your run. Start with easily digested high-carbohydrate food, such as bananas, pretzels, yogurt and energy bars.
  • Drink and eat slowly to avoid throwing up.

Muscle recovery

  • Try to keep walking for up to 15 minutes after completing the run. When you rest, elevate your feet higher than the level of your heart. If you have to sit for a long period of time, make sure you get up and walk around for a few minutes to help limit muscle stiffness.
  • Begin stretching the calves, quadriceps, hamstrings, IT bands, glutes and low back right away with long, gentle stretches.
  • For sore muscles or joints, apply ice or cold packs three to four times per day for 15 minutes for the first two days after your long run or marathon.
  • Avoid taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve) until you are rehydrated because these products may be harmful to the kidneys when you are dehydrated from prolonged exercise.
  • Cryotherapy, NormaTec and Hyperbaric chambers help speed recovery.
  • When you shower, choose lukewarm or cool water. Avoid hot showers for at least one day to allow your body to fully rehydrate. Being dehydrated in a hot shower can cause you to get dizzy and pass out.
  • Avoid hot tubs until your body is fully recovered because they will worsen swelling and inflammation in the muscles and joints.

cryotherapy

Scrapes, chafe and open blisters

  • If you have open scrapes, chafes or blisters, wash the area(s) twice daily with soap and water, apply antibiotic ointment and cover with a band-aid for a few days.
  • For blisters that have not opened, leave them as is or cover with a band-aid.

 

Speak with one of our certified Athletic Trainers about your recovery, today!

904-402-4399

Schedule your Recovery session

Cryotherapy for Athletes: 3 Things You Need to Know

Cryotherapy for Athletes

Cryotherapy for Athletes: 3 Things You Need to Know

All athletes sustain an injury at some point. Whether it is a minor sprain or a ligament tear that requires surgery, every single athletic injury can benefit from cryotherapy. So why do so many athletes fail to use cryotherapy effectively after an injury? Here are a few reasons: They aren’t convinced it works, they don’t do it enough, and they avoid it because it’s uncomfortable.
If you’re an athlete who incurs an occasional is injury, consider these three facts next time you decide not to reach for the ice pack.

1. It Really Works

Applying cold to an injury produces two important effects. It helps relieve pain, and it reduces swelling. Cold slows down nerve activity, which creates a numbing effect and reduces the sensation of pain. It also does it without any of the side effects that prescription or OTC medications might cause.

Cryotherapy also helps reduce swelling and slows down cellular metabolism, which allows your body to heal faster. Excess swelling can impede the healing process and also contributes to uncomfortable pressure pain. Slower cellular metabolism means less cell death and therefore less tissue for the body to repair.

2. It Takes More Than One Application

Every athlete knows that he or she is supposed to apply cold right after an injury occurs. However, all too often this is the only time that athletes do it. Successful application of cryotherapy requires multiple sessions for several days for 20 to 30 minutes at a time. While this might be inconvenient, it is a small commitment to make for athletes who want to get back to their normal routine as fast as possible.

Cryotherapy can also be used for the duration of the injury-recovery period, not just for the first couple of days after being hurt. Many athletes also like to use cryotherapy after practices or games so that sore muscles recover more quickly.

3. It Doesn’t Have to be Uncomfortable

Ice baths are some athletes’ worst nightmares. Even holding an ice pack in the same spot becomes tedious, especially if you need to use your hands for other activities. At Sports Recovery Annex, our Certified Athletic Trainers customize a plan that is right for you.

Natural Ways to Relieve Inflammation

inflammation

Natural Ways to Relieve Inflammation

In this life, you only get one body – you want to look and feel as good as possible, right? You don’t have to suffer any longer! Here’s your guide to relieving inflammation . . . the natural way!

1. First things first, are you getting enough omega-3 fatty acids?

Inflammation can be extremely painful and has been known to cause irritation, infection, redness, and swelling. However, fueling your body with omega-3 fatty acids has been known to counteract this discomfort. Just where can you find these good, fatty acids?

  • Fish Oil
  • Chia Seeds
  • Salmon
  • Tuna
  • Flaxseeds

2. Are you currently getting enough vitamin D?

Used to treat a variety of ailments, including bone weakness and pain, bone loss, and inflammation, there are different ways to consume vitamin D, including:

  • Supplements
  • Cheese
  • Egg Yolks (other dairy products)

3. This may be the hardest tip of all, but it’s an important one: avoid Sugar!

Sugar tastes good, gets in the way of the healing process and can cause mayhem in the long term. The rule of moderation applies – sometimes, you just need to treat your body. However, think about it: Is suffering from inflammation worth consuming large amounts of sugar? If you have a sweet tooth, it may be difficult, but try to avoid foods that are high in sugar.

4. There should be plenty of antioxidant-rich foods included in your diet.

Particularly, antioxidants can help keep you healthy, and even assist in preventing diseases, as they prohibit the oxidation of other molecules in the body. While you can take an antioxidant vitamin, it’s also easy to find these nutrients in common foods. Try eating the following (perhaps you already do):

  • Purple and Red Grapes
  • Blueberries and Strawberries
  • Nuts (specifically, walnuts)
  • Dark Green Vegetables (the best examples are broccoli, spinach, kale, and collard greens)

5. The Techie Way

While inflammation is the healing way the body responds to injury, it can cause diseases when chronic.

Whole body cryotherapy is a natural and healthy alternative to pain relievers. The cold temperature causes the body to reboot itself, increasing the release of anti-inflammatory chemicals that will soothe the affected areas. The improved blood flow will allow for a more effective elimination of the toxins that were slowing down the healing process.

There are many benefits to using cryotherapy from physical recovery to health and wellness; its most immediate being alleviating pain and decreasing inflammation.

If you want to relieve inflammation the natural way, then start incorporating the tips listed above into your daily life. Unfortunately, change takes time. You can’t consume a bunch of blueberries today and sporadically feel better tomorrow. However, if you begin making consistent changes, and stick with a plan, you’ll be sure to feel better in no time!

So, what are you waiting for? Book your session, today! 

Bumps N’ Bruises Free Clinic This Summer

Bumps N' Bruises Free Clinic

It’s that time of year again when the smell of freshly cut grass, the Friday night lights, and two-a-day practices mean one thing: football season has returned. And football’s not the only sport that has kicked into high gear around the region. Hundreds of local athletes are prepping for the start of volleyball, soccer, cross country, and cheerleading.

When it comes to sports, winning may be important, but staying safe and healthy is also a priority. Every hit, kick, block, and score is accompanied by a risk of injury.

If an athlete sustains an injury on a Friday night or during the weekend at a game, many may not know where to get help for the injury.

This is why Sports Recovery Annex holds a Bumps and Bruises Clinics every Saturday morning, providing Jacksonville athletes with access to sports medicine professionals so they can return to their sport quickly and safely.

Sports Recovery Annex’s free Bumps and Bruises clinic is the perfect opportunity to help keep you or your athlete in the game.

In the meantime, here are a few tips that can help lower the risk of serious injury and can keep your athletes playing strong;

First, make sure your athlete’s equipment is sized and fits properly. Football helmets, pads and other equipment should fit well, with nothing too loose or too tight. A helmet that doesn’t fit properly may cause serious damage if a strong hit is applied. Additionally, shin pads, knee pads, and appropriate ankle braces should fit well and be worn when needed.

Second, make sure your athlete is doing a proper warm-up and cool-down at the start and end of each practice and game. A quality warm up includes some light cardio and easy stretching. This will help prevent those common tears and strains during the game, because muscles, tendons and ligaments will be warmed up. Cooling down will help the muscles calm down after vigorous movement and activity.

Third, make sure your athlete gets professional help for any bumps, bruises, strains, sprains or other seemingly minor incidents during the season. What you or your child may think is just a nagging ailment might be something much worse. Better to get it checked out immediately than risk losing part or all of your sports season. Untreated minor injuries could lead to more serious injuries.

We Make Getting Treated Easy!

Sports Recovery Annex offers free Bumps N’ Bruises clinics to all athletes. Bumps N’ Bruises clinic is the perfect opportunity to help keep your athlete in the game.

The clinic is free and is held every Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. this summer. Please check our Event Calendar for more information on our free clinics.

Explore The Benefits of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Explore The Benefits of Hyperbaric Therapy
Explore The Benefits of Hyperbaric Therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves exposing the body to 100% oxygen – that is greater than what you normally experience.

Hyperbaric Therapy has become more prevalent in today’s collegiate and professional world. But, you may be asking yourself, is this for me? Well, unless you plan to drink alcoholic beverages before trying it out, (NOT recommended) it’s for you!

Now that we have that out of the way, you may be wondering how Hyperbaric Therapy works. Hyperbaric Therapy is a safe method of delivering more oxygen to the body at a cellular level. Our Hyperbaric Therapy Chamber utilizes filtered pressurized ambient air to dissolve oxygen directly into the plasma, cerebral and spinal fluids. This floods the tissues and vital organs with oxygen. This allows for healing at the cellular level and is critical for healthy tissue formation. This increase in oxygen makes it possible for healthier organs & ultimately a healthier body overall. In layman’s terms, it allows the body to get the oxygen it needs to create ATP (the high-energy molecule that stores the energy we need to do just about everything) for energy and flush out the lactic acid that causes muscle fatigue.

The elevated oxygen levels help increase performance and recovery more quickly after a workout.

A sports injury can be especially devastating for an athlete. Often, athletes re-injure themselves or make their conditions worse by attempting to return to full activity before their bodies are healed.  This treatment allows up to tenfold increase in the oxygen level of the blood plasma and hemoglobin.

With hyperbaric treatment, a sprained ankle might recover in four days instead of eight; a bruised thigh could mend in one week, not three. Recovery time is reduced significantly and athletes get back into play faster.

“Despite how futuristic sleeping in hyperbaric chamber may seem, this has become a common practice among many NFL players for a few years now.

One of those athletes is New York Giants running back, Rashad Jennings.”

 “The reason why I and so many NFL players engage in sleeping [in] these chambers is because a hyperbaric chamber reduces swelling, promotes the healing of wounds, helps fight off dangerous infections, and increases the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream.”- Rashad Jennings (ESPN.COM)

A normal session lasts around 60 minutes. Which may have you wondering what you do during that time. During your session, you are more than welcome to listen to music, bring a small portable device to watch a movie, talk on your cell phone, or sleep! No dangerous side effects have been reported with this therapy.  At Sports Recovery Annex,  your Certified Athletic Trainer will be monitoring you the entire time.

To find out more about our Hyperbaric Therapy Chamber, Call us at (904) 402-4399.

Sports Recovery Annex offers every day and professional athletes access to state-of-the-art recovery tools, specialized service providers and space to treat your body to the best recovery options that Florida has to offer.

References:

“Jennings investing in his future with hyperbaric chamber – ESPN Video.” ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures, n.d. Web. 11 May 2017.

“Main Page Hyperbaric PHP.” HYPERBARIC PHP. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 May 2017.

Whole Body Cryotherapy- Put your pain on ice

cryotherapyCryotherapy…You’ve heard the stories, read the articles and may even have your own thoughts about this popular recovery method. But, have you tried it? Sports Recovery Annex is a walk-in sports recovery facility that provides everyday athletes and professionals access to state-of-the-art recovery tools and equipment once only available to Olympic athletes and the Pro’s

EndorphinsScared you can’t handle the cold? Trust us, your body will take care of that. Cryotherapy works for pain by triggering the body’s “fight or flight” response, which produces endorphins. Endorphins decrease the body’s perception of pain. Take it from Elle Woods…”Endorphins make you happy”.

“Combining treatment techniques enhances their effectiveness and maximizes your benefits,” says Sports Recovery Annex’s Head Athletic Trainer, Catherine Horita.

Chronic pain can be a frustrating and debilitating condition, so why not put your pain on ice, with Cryotherapy.

Whole Body Cryotherapy is a popular process for helping with a variety of conditions as well as rejuvenating and revitalizing the body. For many professional athletes, ice baths are part a weekly routine. Sports Recovery Annex’s Cryotherapy takes away all the negative aspects of an ice bath. The length of time and the initial dip in an ice bath are a thing of the past. A quick 3-minute session in the cryo sauna gives you all the positives of an ice bath. Energy increases and muscles feel invigorated and refreshed. Today, Whole Body Cryotherapy is growing increasingly popular with athletes and chronic illness sufferers alike, finding its way into many commercial spas and athletic training facilities. Pro athletes like Lebron James, Kobe Bryant and Floyd Mayweather Jr. swear by the benefits of Whole Body Cryotherapy and use it to alleviate symptoms such as delayed onset muscle soreness after workouts.

 

Cryotherapy is not limited to athletes however, It can have manyCryotherapy other benefits;

  • Assists in a quicker surgical recovery
  • Aids in the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis
  • Helps provide relief from nerve pain
  • Helps in the reduction of Fibromyalgia pain
  • Aids in the treatment of degenerative disease of the joints and spine
  • Assists in the treatment of inflammation of tendons, bursae, and joint capsules
    ….And much more!

Jimmy Manos, a first-time cryotherapy patient explains his experience:

“I did feel instantly chilled, but it was all over quickly. A mere two minutes in the chamber left me feeling euphoric and refreshed, a feeling that stayed with me for the rest of the day. And I had a really good night’s sleep for a change”.

Step into our Impact cryo sauna to experience the benefits of whole body cryotherapy! Using cold temperatures to promote natural healing and wellness, Sports Recovery Annex provides whole body cryotherapy as a fast and effective alternative to traditional ice baths.

Check out News4Jax Anchor Vic Micolucci try his first cryotherapy session!